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Eyeglass lenses - overlooked or looked right through?

By First Vision Media Group, Inc.

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Eyeglasses are essentially a relationship between lenses and frames. The frames are the fashionable part of the duo, so they get most of the fanfare, while the lenses do most of the "heavy lifting" but attract little attention. It's time to put lenses in the spotlight so that they can be seen for their awesome capabilities instead of being seen right through like they're not even there. The material used in your eyeglass lenses affects their clarity, durability, weight, and cost. Here are the main advantages/disadvantages:

Plastic/CR-39®: Consisting of good optical quality, this material is lightweight and more shatter resistant than glass and accepts tints easily. Disadvantages—it's thicker than polycarbonate or high-index plastic lenses. You'll want to add a scratch resistant lens treatment for added durability and a special treatment for 100% ultraviolet (UV) protection.

Polycarbonate: This material is 10 times more impact-resistant than plastic, thinner than plastic/glass, and lighter than plastic, and it blocks 100% of UV rays. Disadvantages—you'll want to add a scratch-resistant lens treatment for durability and an anti-reflective (AR) treatment, too.

Trivex: This material offers top-notch impact resistance, making it an ideal choice for safety glasses, sports goggles, and children's eyewear. It's the lightest lens material available, it blocks 100% of UV rays, and it may produce sharper central vision than polycarbonate lenses. Disadvantage— you'll want to add an AR lens treatment.

NXT: This material offers superior impact resistance and excellent optical clarity, even for higher powers. It's flexible and ultra-lightweight and blocks 100% of UV rays, without needing a special lens treatment. Disadvantage—it's more expensive.

Mid-to-High Index: These materials weigh up to 50% less and are up to 60% thinner than traditional plastic lenses—great for high prescriptions! Disadvantages—you'll want to add a scratch-resistant lens treatment for durability and an AR treatment to reduce reflections.

eyelines is published by First Vision Media Group, Inc. This content is subject to change without notice and offered for informational use only. You are urged to consult with your individual business, financial, legal, tax and/or other advisors and/or medical providers with respect to any information presented. CareCredit, Synchrony Financial and any of its affiliates (collectively, "Synchrony") make no representations or warranties regarding this content and accept no liability for any loss or harm arising from the use of the information provided. All statements and opinions in eyelines are the sole opinions of First Vision Media Group, Inc. Your receipt of this material constitutes your acceptance of these terms and conditions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the vision care information provided herein, only a qualified medical professional can provide you with precise information about your specific hearing needs. Your receipt of this material constitutes your acceptance of these terms and conditions. Copyright © 2017 First Vision Media Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

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